6 Simple Ways to Ease Into Advocacy as a Nonprofit

GRASSROOTS ADVOCACY.


Have I scared you off yet? These can be frightening words for some nonprofits — but they shouldn’t be.


Most nonprofits, from community groups to social justice organizations, are focused on providing resources and solutions to some of our toughest issues. You’re housing the homeless, feeding the hungry, saving animals, children, babies, and families — helping people meet their basic needs. This is important work — extremely important.


But it doesn’t afford you the you the time or space or energy that is needed to focus on how to solve these issues. However, you have the knowledge, expertise, and real life experience to help solve these tough problems. You see the solutions, you see the possibilities, but you need space and guidance to get this info to the right people — the people who make decisions about laws and policies.


ADVOCACY AFFORDS YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO USE YOUR EXPERTISE TO HELP SOLVE BIG PROBLEMS.


By engaging in advocacy, even in small ways, you can help find solutions to the toughest issues our society faces. And the best part? You can even use this strategy to raise more money! Want to find out how, and what you can do to help?


In this post published by Wild Apricot, I’ve detailed what exactly advocacy is (and isn’t) and six easy steps you can start following today to get more involved in making change happen.

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